Courses

Core/Required Courses

Ken McBey

Ken McBey

GS/HRM 6100: Staffing Organizations
The HRM 6100 'Staffing Organizations' course will explore important research findings and contemporary issues related to the staffing of organizations.
The overall integrative framework will lead us to examine recruitment, selection, orientation/induction, socialization, and personnel retention.

 

 

 

GS/HRM 6200: Employee Training and Development

Marie-Helene Budworth

Marie-Helene Budworth

Organizations are under increasing pressure from technological, political, social and  cultural changes to improve on and adapt existing capabilities. Employee development is a strategic necessity. This course will focus on formal and informal methods of developing talent within an organization. Each term, through readings and large class discussions, we cover topics such as formal and informal learning, developmental relationships, and performance management. The course typically includes a group presentation, a final paper, contributions to discussions in class and on-line, and a final paper.

Parbudyal Singh

Parbudyal Singh

GS/HRM 6300: Strategic Compensation
This course provides students with an understanding of the objectives of a strategic compensation program; the process and techniques of wage and salary determination; issues and problems in incentive systems; benefits and services, and the management of these programs. The course reflects a mix of research and practice. We use a variety of pedagogical techniques to analyze compensation issues, including case studies, simulations, and research projects.

GS/HRM 6400: Organizational Change and Development

Len Karakowsky

Len Karakowsky

This course is aimed at improving your effectiveness as a change agent. HR professionals are increasingly being called upon to assist in change management efforts - from diagnosis of the problem(s), to gathering data, to creating a plan, to implementation of the change effort. We will explore and analyze the criteria necessary to engage in successful change efforts, through grappling with various aspects of change - in understanding conditions that require it, in increasing your awareness of the multitude of ways organizations change, in managing change, in receiving and participating in it, and in understanding your own approaches and responses to change.

Jelena Zikic

Jelena Zikic

GS/HRM 6500: Human Resources Management Effectiveness
This course will focus at the macro level issues, combining organizational strategy to       human resource practices. Unlike other courses focusing mainly at the specific HR policy level, Strategic HRM explores the relationships between firm's strategic objective and HRM system, with a goal on enhancing long term firm performance. The course introduces students to a mix of academic and practitioner literature in helping you understand fairly complex macro level concepts and theories.

GS/HRM 6600: Research, Measurement and Evaluation of Human Resources

Mary Jo Ducharme

Mary Jo Ducharme

What does research methods have to do with Human Resources? Does the typical HR     professional need to know about how research is done? This course is about much more than how to read, understand and critically evaluate research, be it academic or otherwise - although, we do spend time on this of course! We also discuss how research methods can be used to help you design and evaluate the effectiveness of your organizational interventions (or evaluate the organizational interventions of others -- consultants you have hired). Being able to effectively measure and evaluate HR practices is the key to many important HR roadblocks and issues, many of which I hope we will discuss together.

Elective Courses

GS/HRM 6700: Work Law, Policy, and Practice

David J. Doorey

David J. Doorey

HRM 6700 is the law course in the MHRM program. The HR profession is a legal minefield. Almost every activity an HR professional performs has a legal element. This course explores the three regimes of law that govern work: the common law of employment, regulatory standards and collective bargaining law. Students learn how to locate and           research case law and statutes. A mix of lecture, case studies, and student presentations are used in this interactive course. Students will come out of the course with greater legal confidence and tools to use the law in their professional lives.

GS/HRM 6910: Issues in HRM: Career Management Issues

Jelena Zikic

Jelena Zikic

This elective course will focus on important global and local careers management challenges such as cross-cultural communication, gender issues, leadership across cultures, and managing a diverse workforce. To further increase your competence in managing personal as well as careers of your employees, you will engage in self-assessment exercises, peer-coaching and variety of group discussions. In particular, the course will exploit various career metaphors as a way of understanding complexity of contemporary global careers.

Souha R. Ezzedeen

Souha R. Ezzedeen

GS/HRM 6920: Issues in HRM: Work-Life Balance
Reports consistently reveal that workers in North America, particularly knowledge workers, have become increasingly absorbed by work. The "new economy" and deep demographic changes have created a set of circumstances that render participation in family, community, and leisure challenging at best. The resulting consequences for individuals, families, communities, organizations, and society at large have not gone unnoticed. In response, a new academic and practitioner field devoted to "work-life balance" has emerged in the past decades, gaining momentum in the early 1990s. Thus, this course addresses personal/employee as well as organizational/employer perspectives on work-life balance and flexibility.

Schedule of Courses

Students are strongly encouraged to complete HRM 6600 (Research, Measurement and Evaluation of HR) during their first academic term. The program reserves the right to limit enrolment in all courses.

All classes will be held at the York University campus. Each class will meet for four instructional days per term. The course schedules are as follows:

Fall 2016 Courses

CourseCourse Title
HRM 6100Staffing Organizations
HRM 6200Employee Training and Development
HRM 6600Research Measurement and Evaluation of HR
HRM 6700Workplace Law, Policy, and Practice
HRM 6920Issues in HRM: Work/Life Balance

Winter 2017 Courses

CourseCourse Title
HRM 6100Staffing Organizations
HRM 6400Organizational Change and Development
HRM 6500Human Resource Management Effectiveness
HRM 6600Research, Measurement and Evaluation of HR
HRM 6910Issues in HRM: Careers
HRM 6920Issues in HRM: Work/Life Balance

Summer 2017 Courses

CourseCourse Title
HRM 6200Employee Training & Development
HRM 6300Strategic Compensation
HRM 6400Organizational Change and Development
HRM 6500HRM Effectiveness
HRM 6700Workplace Law, Policy, and Practice
Students enrolled in the PhD in HRM are required to complete the following:

Year 1: HRM 6500 HRM Effectiveness (fall) HRM 7020 Quantitative Research Methods (fall)
HRM 7040 Univariate Statistics (winter)
HRM 7110 HRM Research Seminar 1 (winter)
Year 2: HRM 7030 Teaching, Learning + Pedagogical Processes (fall)
HRM 7010 Qualitative Research Methods (fall)
HRM 7050 Multivariate Statistics (winter)
HRM 7120 HRM Research Seminar 2 (winter)
Year 3: Comprehensive examination
Dissertation Proposal
Dissertation
Teaching practicum
Year 4: Dissertation

Advanced standing

Some applicants to the program will have successfully completed graduate level courses that are the equivalent of the required courses in Univariate Statistics and HRM Theory and Practice prior to admission. These students may apply for advanced standing in either one or both of these courses. Students granted advanced standing will be allowed to take the Year 2 research method (s) courses.

Comprehensive examination

Students are required to write a three-part comprehensive examination after successfully completing the required coursework. The examination is designed to assess the student’s competence and knowledge in three areas: Research Methods; Seminal and Macro-HRM Research –material from Seminar 1; and Micro-HRM research –material from Seminar 2. The  parts of the exam (one in each area) are held on three successive days.

Students are given "Fail," "Pass," and "Pass, with distinction" grades. A second and final exam may be allowed for students who do not pass the exam in their first attempt.

Dissertation proposal

All students are required to submit and defend a formal research proposal in their third year in the program. The proposal defence involves a presentation to the HRM faculty. In general, the proposal (approx. 3500 words) outlines the objectives for the study, the need for research on the selected issue, a review of the pertinent literature, and a discussion of the proposed methodology. To be acceptable, the proposal must be judged “achievable” (e.g., the research issue is well-defined, data and resources are available, the project can be completed within time, etc.), and deemed to contribute to the literature.

Dissertation

Each doctoral student writes a dissertation, which is an embodiment of the results of their original research. The dissertation is written under the guidance of a principal supervisor and a committee, established for each student in accordance with the rules of the FGS. The evaluation procedures ensure that the dissertation represents high-quality, original research deserving of a PhD in HRM.